JAKARTA – Not only unique, Logitech ® Wireless Mouse M235 Limited Edition is fairly advanced. Because the mouse has been equipped with a Logitech ® Advanced Optical Tracking that can work in almost any kind of surface.
Connectivity Logitech Advanced 2.4 GHz wireless gives you the freedom to faster data transmission and no lag or connection is lost.
This advanced wireless mouse connected via nano-receiver is so small sturdy nan, you simply connect it to the USB port and then forget about it. Product contoured and comfortable in the hand, with rubber grip and scroll whell to scroll naturally.
Logitech ® Wireless Mouse M235 is equipped with On / Off button and an intelligent sleep mode, to help you to conserve battery power, so the battery can last up to 1 year, depending on usage patterns and computing conditions.
Logitech ® Wireless Mouse M235 Limited Edition has been available in the Indonesian market with a retail price of USD 19.99 or approximately USD 190 thousand.

Zulu Creative is proud to announce the launch of a new website for MAX’s Wine Dive, the award-winning, rockin’ restaurant concept from Houston-based Lasco Enterprises that combines gourmet comfort food with retail wine sales and features unlikely pairings such as fried chicken and champagne. The new website is mobile-friendly for diners on-the-go and contains unique content for five MAX’s locations in Austin, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston and San Antonio, plus corporate-specific content. The MAX’s website is the second of three that Zulu Creative is designing for Lasco. A new website for Boiler House, Lasco’s Texas grill and wine garden concept located at the historic Pearl Brewery in San Antonio, was completed in fall 2012. A complete redesign of The Tasting Room site is forthcoming.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130723/MN51688)

Taking its design cue from current branding, the new MAX’s site features a black and white color palette with red accents and bold typographical elements. Zulu Creative recommended key website enhancements to better convey MAX’s funky, eclectic brand vibe online. The website reflects each location’s unique ambience and personality through witty slogans on each page, graphical jukebox-inspired elements that evoke the restaurant’s dive-bar feel, and location-specific featured images.

Site visitors can easily make online reservations and access key information such as each location’s address, hours, contact information and menus. In addition, visitors can view each location’s calendar of events, read chef and wine manager bios, see private event/catering options, purchase gift cards online, sign up for MAX’s newsletter and easily connect with MAX’s through their social media channels. Press+Awards pages tout each location’s accolades, while a corporate Employment page lists all job openings by location and serves as a useful recruiting tool.

Designed and built on a content management system (CMS) platform with multisite functionality, the website is scalable, making it easy to manage multiple websites through a single interface and add new sites as Lasco opens new MAX’s locations.

“We are extremely excited about the new website for MAX’s Wine Dive created by the talented team at Zulu Creative,” said Jonathan Horowitz, Chief Brand Officer of Lasco Enterprises. “Throughout the entire creative process, the Zulu team exercised intense attention to detail and introduced a new site that is easy for our guests to navigate, as well as met our goal to produce a product which mimics the energy, look and feel of the MAX’s Wine Dive concept.”

“Designing sites for three award-winning Lasco brands is an exciting opportunity and huge honor,” says Tina Zulu, Founder and Creative Chieftess of Zulu Creative. “Our experience creating websites for other successful restaurants and bars made the Boiler House, MAX’s Wine Dive and The Tasting Room projects a perfect fit for us, and our teams work extremely well together. We couldn’t be more thrilled and congratulate Lasco on their continued success and growth. Cheers!”

About Zulu Creative
Fun! And smart! Zulu Creative is a boutique agency in Midtown Houston, Texas, specializing in marketing and brand development for lifestyle businesses that serve consumer niche markets. The Zulu crew is a dynamic team of intelligent professionals who are energetic, innovative, passionate and reliable. Clients who choose Zulu Creative get a big bang for their buck, benefit from a diverse team of experience and talent, and enjoy a smashing, cutting-edge image in the Houston community, nationally and globally. Whether a brand needs a kick-start, upgrade or extreme makeover, Zulu Creative

Want to feel the sensation of the Android experience to a jolly? If so, the latest portable PCs known as Thanko Quad-core Android SmartTV 2 this might be an alternative solution.

With features and capabilities that it has, you can use Android SmartTV Thanko Quad-core 2 is to convert non-Adroid devices such as LCD TV into an Android device.

PC portable measuring 122x175x121mm and weighs 250g is complemented by a 1.6GHz Quad Core CPU, operating system Android 4.2 Jelly Bean, and a built-in 2GB memory. And thanks to the existence of two existing USB terminal, you can use it with a keyboard, mouse, portable HDD and so on.

While about prices in Japan itself, Thanko Quad-core Android SmartTV 2 priced around ¥ 14,800 or the equivalent of 1.5 million dollars per unit.

New software has been developed that aims to restrict the manufacture of firearms that have been created using new 3-D technology.

The world’s first gun made using 3-D printing – called “The Liberator” – was successfully fired on May 6 in Austin, Texas. In just three days the blueprint created by startup Defense Distributed to produce the plastic gun had been downloaded around 100,000 times, according to Forbes Magazine.

Anti-gun campaigners have criticized the project, whilst lawmakers in different U.S. states have moved to pass new legislation to prohibit the manufacture, sale and use of the digitally made firearms. And now Danish startup Create It REAL has produced software that it says blocks users from printing guns in the first place.

“The likely buyers are 3-D printer manufacturers who want to minimize their liability risk and offer a firearm parental control feature to their customers,” Create It REAL’s CEO Jeremie Pierre Gay told CNBC.

“The feature creates a unique digital fingerprint of the firearm…the manufacturer could decide to block the print or to simply give a warning to the user of the potential danger.”

The software has taken a year to develop. The firm realized there was a gap in the market after surveying end users and 3D printer manufacturers. Gay told CNBC that his previous job working with Digital Rights Management (DRM) for technology firm Motorola served him well.

“[We realized] people are interested in the ability to put a lock on their firearms at home, the same should be possible on a 3D printer as a parental control feature. I would say that this feature is customer driven even if they did not know they wanted the feature when we asked,” he said.

“The possibility to make a firearm at home is not new, there are many plans on how to do it on Internet, the problem with 3-D printing is that it could become simply too easy, this feature makes it more complicated again.”

Cody Wilson, the man behind nonprofit Defense Distributed was skeptical that the product would actually be able to prohibit the printing of guns, which are produced as separate parts and then assembled. “The Liberator” is printed with hard plastic and fires a standard .380 caliber bullet. The only non-printed piece is a common hardware store nail which is used as its firing pin.

“Such software must walk a very fine line, of which I’ve no doubt it is incapable…It’s interesting PR to the uninitiated only,” the 25-year-old law student at the University of Texas told CNBC.

“‘The Liberator’ pistol is an assembly of over 17 parts, most of which individually would not set off a detection software unless the exact model was blacklisted. Think about it, springs, hammer, even the grip. These are not ‘guns’.”

‘Wild West’ Regulation

Both New York City and New York State have introduced legislation to curb the making of 3-D printed firearms or ban their use altogether and similar bills have been introduced in California. Linda Rosenthal, a New York State assembly member told CNBC that New York’s bill is currently sitting with the Codes Committee after the legislative session ended on June 21.

“I have all intentions of pursuing this legislation next session,” she told CNBC. “The controversy surrounding the passage of the SAFE ACT (the New York Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act) will make passing any piece of gun-related

Today’s programming languages have traditionally been created by the tech giants. These languages are made up of millions of lines of code, so the tech giants only invest in incremental, non-breaking changes that address their business concerns. This is why innovation in popular languages like C, Java, and JavaScript is depressingly slow.

Open-source languages like Python and Ruby gained widespread industrial use by solving backend problems at startup scale. Without the constraints of legacy code and committee politics, language designers are free to explore meaningful language innovation. And with compile-to-VM languages, it has become cheap enough for individuals and startups to create the future of programming languages themselves.

Open-source language innovation has not yet disrupted front-end programming. We still use the same object-oriented model that took over the industry in the 1980s. The tech giants are heavily committed to this approach, but open-source has made it possible to pursue drastically different methods.

Two years ago, I began to rethink front-end programming from scratch. I quickly found myself refining a then-obscure academic idea called Functional Reactive Programming. This developed into Elm, a language that compiles to JavaScript and makes it much easier to create highly interactive programs.

Since the advent of Elm, a lively and friendly community has sprung up, made up of everyone from professional developers to academics to beginners who have never tried functional programming before. This diversity of voices and experiences has been a huge help in guiding Elm towards viability as a production-ready language.

The community has already created a bunch of high quality contributions that are shaping the future of Elm and are aiming to shape the future of front-end programming.

Dev tools

Early on, I made it a priority to let people write, compile, and use Elm programs directly from their browser. No install, no downloads. This interactive editor made it easy for beginners and experts alike to learn Elm and start using it immediately.

In-browser compilation triggered lots of discussion, ideas, and ultimately contributions. Mads Flensted-Urech added in-line documentation for all standard libraries. Put your cursor over a function, and you get the type, prose explanation, and link to the library it comes from. Laszlo Pandy took charge of debugging tools. He is focusing on visualizing the state of an Elm program as time passes, even going so far as pausing, rewinding, and replaying events.

Runtime

I designed Elm to work nicely with concurrency. Unfortunately, JavaScript’s concurrency support is quite poor with questionable prospects for improvement. I decided to save the apparent implementation quagmire for later, but John P. Mayer decided to make it happen. He now has a version of the runtime that can automatically multiplex tasks across many threads, all implemented in JavaScript.

Common to all of these cases are driven individuals who knew they could do it better. This is how Elm got started and how it caught the attention of Prezi, a company also not content to accept JavaScript as the one and only answer for front-end development. I have since joined the company for the express purpose of furthering work on Elm.

We do not need to sit and hope that the tech giants will someday do an okay job. We can create the future of front-end programming ourselves, and we can do it now.